Concessional (before tax)

Concessional contributions are contributions made with pre-tax income. They are called concessional contributions because income directed to superannuation is taxed at a concessional rate – generally a lower rate than other income.

Concessional contributions are usually made by employers, on an employee’s behalf.

Employer contributions

Contributions paid by your employer on your behalf. These may be paid at:

  • the minimum rate set by the Superannuation Guarantee (SG)
  • the minimum rate set by an industrial award or agreement, or
  • a higher than minimum rate set by your employer.

Salary sacrifice

Additional contributions you make from your pre-tax income to your super account by entering into a salary sacrifice agreement with your employer.

Self-employed contributions

Voluntary contributions you make to your super that you claim a tax deduction for if you are self-employed.

Super Splitting

Directing some of your employer or salary sacrifice contributions to your spouse's account. These contributions count toward your concessional cap.

Low income super contribution

A government contribution of up to $500 paid to your super if you earn $37,000 or less in a financial year and make concessional contributions to a complying super fund.

You cannot receive the Low Income Super Contribution if you have not provided your Tax File Number (TFN) to your super fund.